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BUDDHIST TERRORISM AND GENOCIDE AGAINST ROHINGYA
#1
BUDDHIST TERRORISM AND GENOCIDE AGAINST  ROHINGYAS 
www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/09/indonesia-fm-urge-myanmar-halt-rohingya-violence-170903160924784.html
www.presstv.com/Detail/2017/09/02/533825/Indonesia-Rohingya-Muslims-police-crackdown-UN-Bangladesh

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/09/in...24784.html
www.presstv.com/Detail/2017/09/01/533709/Erdogan-Rohingya-Muslims-genocide
http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/feature...42812.html


GENOCIDE OF ROHINGYA MUSLIMS BY MYANMAR ARMY AND BUDDHIST VIGILANTES

ROHINGYA REFUGEES CAUGHT BETWEEN TWO NASTY REGIMES
https://crescent.icit-digital.org/articl...ty-regimes


BURMA's ROHINGYA MUSLIMS FACE WORST CRISIS YET 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iMcaktqgFxA


STRAIT TALK : THE SCREAMS OF ROHINGYAS



FIVE THINGS TO DO AND KNOW THE ROHINGYA 
ww.ihrc.org.uk/activities/campaigns/11947-five-things-to-do-and-know-the-rohingya
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#2
AYATOLLAH KHAMENEI URGES ACTION AGAINST MYANMAR GOVERNMENT OVER ROHINGYA MUSLIMS 
http://www.presstv.com/Detail/2017/09/12...c-pressure

Leader of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei has called on Islamic governments to exert political and economic pressure on Myanmar’s “cruel” government to make it stop a deadly crackdown on minority Rohingya Muslims in the Southeast Asian country.

Speaking on Tuesday, Ayatollah Khamenei urged practical measures by Islamic governments to end the crisis in Myanmar.

“Of course, practical measures don’t mean military deployments. Rather, they (Islamic governments) have to increase their political, economic, and trade pressure on Myanmar’s government and cry out against these crimes in international organizations,” the Leader said.

Myanmar’s government has laid a siege to a western state where the Rohingya are concentrated. There, horrific violence has been taking place against the minority Muslims, according to reports and eyewitnesses.

Soldiers and extremist Buddhists have reportedly been killing or raping the Muslims and setting their homes on fire. The Myanmarese government says 400 people, mostly Muslims, have died in the latest bout of violence. The UN says the actual number likely tops 1,000. Ayatollah Khamenei strongly criticized the silence and inaction of international bodies and self-proclaimed human rights advocates on those ongoing atrocities.

The Leader said the crisis in Myanmar is a political issue and should not be reduced to a religious conflict between Muslims and Buddhists, although he said religious prejudice may have been involved.

“This is a political issue because the party that has been carrying out the atrocities is Myanmar’s government, at the top of which is a cruel woman who has won the Nobel Peace Prize. And with these incidents, the death of the Nobel Peace Prize has been spelled,” he said. Myanmar’s de facto leader, Aung Sang Suu Kyi, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, has taken almost no action to end the deadly violence against the Rohingya in the country’s western Rakhine State. Recently, she said widespread reports of brutal violence against the Muslims were fake news.


Ayatollah Khamenei said the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) should convene to discuss the crisis in Myanmar. 

The Leader said Iran has to be bold in making its stance known. 
“The world today is the world of oppression, and the Islamic Republic has to maintain for itself the honor of speaking out against oppression anywhere in the world, whether in territories occupied by Zionists, or in Bahrain, or Yemen, or Myanmar,” he said.


UN URGES AN END TO ROHINGYA VIOLENCE

UN head demands Myanmar government to halt military action in Rakhine state and grant Muslim-minority legal status.

Guterres called on the authorities to allow the UN and NGOs into Rakhine State to provide humanitarian aid 

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has called on the Myanmar government to end its military campaign against the Rohingya Muslims, acknowledging that the minority group was being ethnically cleansed in the Buddhist-majority nation. 

Speaking ahead of a closed-door UN Security Council meeting to discuss the humanitarian crisis on Wednesday, Guterres called the situation for the Rohingya refugees "catastrophic" and "completely unacceptable".

Around 370,000 of Myanmar's minority Rohingya population have fled the country's western state of Rakhine into neighbouring Bangladesh in recent weeks, according to the UN.
The violence began on August 25, after Rohingya fighters attacked police posts, prompting a military crackdown.

"I call on the Myanmar authorities to suspend military action, end the violence, uphold the rule of law and recognise the right of return of all those who have had to leave the country," the UN chief said at the press conference in New York. Guterres' comments mirrored those of UN human rights chief Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein, who denounced the situation in Myanmar as "a textbook example of ethnic cleansing" on Monday. Al Jazeera's Rosiland Jordan, reporting from the UN headquarters, said it remains to be seen if the Security Council can do anything from a practical standpoint following Wednesday's meeting. "There is a lot of concern here at the UN about the ongoing crisis," she said. "The question is who can be held accountable and can the situation be resolved quickly or is there going to be another looming humanitarian catastrophe." 
 
Guterres' remarks came as Myanmar's national leader Aung San Suu Kyi cancels her trip to next week's UN General Assembly to deal with the crisis, her office said on Wednesday. She is due to give her first speech on the crisis in a televised address next week.  Suu Kyi has been widely condemned for a lack of moral leadership and compassion in the face of the crisis, denting the Nobel peace laureate's reputation. The secretary-general also said he has spoken to Suu Kyi several times.

Dramatic tragedy
Pressure has been mounting on Myanmar to end the recent surge in violence, with the United States calling for protection of civilians and Bangladesh urging safe zones to enable refugees to go home.

Asked if the situation could be described as ethnic cleansing, Guterres replied: "Well I would answer your question with another question: When one-third of the Rohingya population had to flee the country, could you find a better word to describe it?"  Myanmar's government said on Wednesday that 176 Rohingya villages were completely empty, as residents fled the recent upsurge in violence. "This is a dramatic tragedy," Guterres said. "People are dying and suffering at horrible numbers and we need to stop it. That is my main concern. The government says about 400 people have been killed in the latest fighting in the western state. Guterres called on the authorities to allow the UN and NGOs into Rakhine State to provide humanitarian aid. The UN describes the Rohingya as the world's most persecuted people. The Rohingya have suffered years of discrimination and have been denied citizenship in Myanmar since 1982. 

But Guterres said that the Myanmar government should either grant the Rohingya nationality or legal status that would allow them to live a normal life.
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#3
THE TRUTH BEHIND WHAT REALLY HAPPENED
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NuqZ3vQBJEU

ROHINGYA: HATE SPEECH, LIES AND MEDIA MISINFORMATION
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lSWpV3rk8c0&feature=youtu.be

UPFRONT - AUNG SAN SUU KYI : TURNING HER BACK ON ROHINGYA? 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HFZGgusN7_I

GEORGE GALLOWAY TALKS ABOUT BURMA GENOCIDE OF ROHINGYA PEOPLE
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxbkwuOSRlI
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlKMTVQ9wJY

GEORGE GALLOWAY BLASTS AUNG SAN SUU KYI AND DEMANDS HER NOBEL PEACE PRIZE STRIPPED FROM HER 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pQlUNC4a8c

GENOCIDE OF THE ROHINGYA 
Mahboob Alam
https://crescent.icit-digital.org/articles/genocide-of-the-rohingya

ROHINGYA: ABANDONED BY THE WORLD
 www.hizb.org.uk/multimedia/videos/rohingya-abandoned-world
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#4
WHO CAN PROTECT THE ROHINGYA MUSLIMS ?

The US' top diplomat decries Rohingya suffering but stops short of calling it ethnic cleansing or demanding sanctions.
http://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/insi...33623.html

Depending on who you ask, the Rohingya people in Myanmar are facing ethnic cleansing, genocide, or simply a complicated situation. Myanmar's government has exonerated itself and says accusations against the military are completely false. Many people across the world disagree. Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau calls the plight of the Rohingya a "tremendous concern". US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has also visited Myanmar and denounced "horrific" violence.

What now for the persecuted minority?

Presenter: Mohammed Jamjoom

Guests:
Matthew Smith - Fortify Rights campaign group
Phil Robertson - Human Rights Watch
Simon Billenness - International Campaign for the Rohingya
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#5
ROHINGYA MUST BE CONSULTED BEFORE REPATRIATION
Adam Bemma
http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/11/ro...10411.html

The repatriation deal does not take Rohingya refugees' rights into consideration, said the European Rohingya Council (ERC). Its Malaysia ambassador, Tengku Emma Zuriana, has spoken out against it. "This repatriation process should not proceed until the safety of the Rohingya [can be] ensured," she said. Malaysia is home to about 150,000 Rohingya. Several non-government organisations held a press conference here on Thursday to discuss the repatriation plan.

The United Nations and United States have stated the violent actions taken by Myanmar's armed forces and "local vigilantes" amount to ethnic cleansing against its Rohingya minority. "This must be a voluntary process, in safety and dignity, and for them to return to their homes - not into camps. And if there's any loss of property and life, it must be compensated fairly," Zuriana said.

Malaysian civil society groups and faith-based organisations urged the Myanmar government to end the violence, and to ensure the safety of the Rohingya living in Rakhine state before any repatriation process begins. The Malaysia Consultative Council of Islamic Organisation (MAPIM) said any repatriation deal must include protection and compensation for Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh who've lost everything amid the heavy-handed "security clearance" operation.

"Even if the agreement has been finalised, we strongly call on the UN to ensure safe passage for the Rohingya to return back to their homes," said MAPIM President Mohd Azmi Abdul Hamid. He went on to ask the international community and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN): "What repatriation are they planning to implement when the Rohingya's' lives are totally destroyed?"

Myanmar Ethnic Rohingya Human Rights Organization Malaysia (MERHROM) wanted to remind Bangladesh of past Rohingya repatriations to Myanmar. "[An] estimated 240,000 Rohingya were repatriated by the Bangladesh government under the 1978 agreement, which had a six month time limit. After that, Bangladesh repatriated about 236,000 Rohingya until 2005 under the 1992 agreement," noted MERHROM President Zafar Ahmad. In 2012, Myanmar's armed forces began to force Rohingya into refugee camps, both in Rakhine state and across the border into Bangladesh.

Recent attacks on a police outpost in Rakhine state by the armed group Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army (ARSA) sparked the latest army crackdown. More than 600,000 Rohingya fled their homes into Bangladesh's refugee camps. Hundreds of thousands have fled since late August 

MERHROM wants the UN Security Council to conduct an assessment of the situation in Rakhine state, to ensure military operations against Rohingya have ceased. Myanmar Armed Forces Senior General Min Aung Hlaing has said the Rohingya could return only if they are "real citizens". The UN said on Friday the time wasn't right for a Rohingya return. "At present, conditions in Myanmar's Rakhine state are not in place to enable safe and sustainable returns. Refugees are still fleeing, and many have suffered violence, rape, and deep psychological harm," said Adrian Edwards, a spokesperson for the office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees. "It is critical that returns do not take place precipitously or prematurely, without the informed consent of refugees or the basic elements of lasting solutions in place," he added.


Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh and Malaysia agree they must be consulted. "Until the Myanmar government is serious to improve the situation, the Bangladesh government should not agree to any repatriation plan," Zuriana said. "The European Rohingya Council is calling [on] Myanmar authorities to grant full citizenship to the Rohingya and review the [1982] citizenship law."


ERC called on the international community to send a clear message to Myanmar that it will not tolerate any further violence. It also said it wants to see the UN observe, support, and monitor all investigations into  human rights violations. Humanitarian agencies providing aid and medical services to the Rohingya in Rakhine state are not allowed to access secured areas, where those most affected need urgent help. Until unhindered access is granted to aid agencies in Rakhine by the Myanmar government, refugee and civil society groups in Malaysia will continue to voice opposition to any agreement, they said.

The concern is Myanmar will force returning Rohingya into displacement camps and settlement zones protected by the same armed forces guilty of carrying out attacks them. "They don't have the freedom to go back home," Zuriana said.

  • ROHINGYA TRAPPED IN OPEN AIR PRISON OF APARTHEID
         www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/rohingya-trapped-open-air-prison-apartheid-171121062049964.html

Imagine that your son becomes critically ill, but he is not allowed into the nearest hospital for treatment. You need to travel to the market to earn enough money to put food on the table, but you cannot get the permit required to leave your village. You want to go to school to gain an education, but a government official tells you that people like you are not welcome there. These restrictions are not there for any other reason than because of who you are. Because of your race, your ethnicity and your religion.

This is the daily reality facing hundreds of thousands of people belonging to the Rohingya minority in Myanmar.For months, the world has listened in horror to stories from the more than 600,000 mainly Rohingya who have fled into Bangladesh following the Myanmar security forces' vicious campaign of ethnic cleansing. Soldiers have killed people at random, torched whole villages and committed rape and other acts of sexual violence. But these violations have not happened in a vacuum. Today, Amnesty International is publishing a ground-breaking investigation into the root causes of the current crisis. It reveals the full extent of the state-sponsored and dehumanising system of discrimination facing Rohingya inside their own country.

We have spent the past two years gathering an extensive body of evidence and conducting a thorough legal analysis of the situation in Rakhine state, the western region of Myanmar which is home to the vast majority of Rohingya. Ultimately, we drew the obvious legal conclusion: what the Rohingya are subjected to is nothing short of the crime against humanity that is apartheid. This crime is clearly defined in international law, including in the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court.


For the Rohingya still left in Myanmar, life inside Rakhine State resembles an open-air prison. They live under a system of repression that is upheld through an intricate web of laws, policies and practices, imposed by state officials at all levels - township, district, state and nation-wide.

At the heart of the discriminatory policies are extreme restrictions on the Rohingya's' freedom of movement. Across the entire state, Rohingya need official permission to travel between townships. In some areas, they need special permits even to move between villages.

In others, they are essentially under lockdown in their homes every night, and at risk of arrest if they try to leave villages or neighbourhoods without authorisation or outside of curfew hours. 

There are even areas where Rohingya are not allowed to use roads but can only travel by waterways, and then only to other Muslim villages. For those who do obtain permission to travel, a network of checkpoints is a source of endless harassment, extortion and sometimes violence at the hands of the notorious Border Guard Police in northern Rakhine State.

For Rohingya who need medical care, access to the main hospital in the state capital Sittwe is severely restricted, except in extreme emergency cases. Those who do get admitted are kept under police guard in separate "Muslim wards". Rohingya children are largely banned from government schools, while government teachers often refuse to travel to Muslim areas. The restrictions also mean that accessing food or livelihood opportunities is an enormous struggle. Malnutrition and poverty are extremely widespread.

Underpinning this discrimination is the fact that Rohingya have essentially been denied citizenship - and the rights associated with it - since the early 1980s when authorities enacted a law to this effect. But the repression has intensified alarmingly recently - in particular since 2012 when waves of violence between Muslims and Buddhist, who were often supported security officials, swept the region.


I have spent the past two years travelling back and forth to Rakhine state and the stories I have heard have been deeply moving. Over and over again, Rohingya and other Muslim communities described their lives in Rakhine State in terms such as living in a cage. I spoke to a 16-year-old girl who, just hours after sitting her school physics exam, told me she had abandoned her dream of becoming a doctor because as a Rohingya she was not allowed to access higher education. Countless people said they were struggling to survive, not the least because the government continues to deny aid groups access to Rakhine state.

What unites almost everyone I spoke to is a profound sense of hopelessness and despair about the future. Many have been trapped in this reality for as long as they can remember, and cannot see a way out. "There is no rule of law here. It is a lawless land... There is no hope," the father of a young man who was killed by border guard police told me.

The only way forward is for the Myanmar government to act immediately to dismantle this appalling regime. A very first step must be to develop a comprehensive action plan to dismantle the system of apartheid, which must include repealing or amending all discriminatory laws and radically changing policies and practices. Crimes against humanity are being committed in Rakhine State on a daily basis. The evidence documented by Amnesty International indicates that these crimes are committed in the context of an institutionalised regime of systematic oppression and domination of a racial group and thus constitute the crime of apartheid.

This cannot be ignored and swept under the carpet. A climate of impunity where human rights violations and crimes go unpunished only serves to perpetuate the cycle of abuse. There must be accountability and those responsible - regardless of rank or position - must be brought to justice. If the government is unwilling and unable to take up this task, which it so far has been, the international community must step in. States must use every diplomatic tool at their disposal to pressure the Myanmar authorities to act now. Donor countries, in particular, must be careful to ensure that development aid is not spent in a way that props up this nightmarish system. The world can no longer stand idle in the face of this 21st century apartheid.
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#6
Bug 
WORLD EXCLUSIVE 

ANOTHER  NONMUSLIM GENOCIDE COMMITTED AGAINST MUSLIMS AND CROCODILE TEARS SHED .  THE PROSECUTION OF GENOCIDAL NAZI BUDDHIST WAR CRIMINALS AND  AUNG SAN SUU KYI  IS NOT ENOUGH. WHAT ABOUT SANCTIONS AND  REGIME CHANGE AND IS NOT IT TIME TO RAISE A  REAL INDEPENDENT GLOBAL TRANSNATIONAL ISLAMIC ARMY OF JUSTICE DEFENDING THE DEFENCELESS AND TAKING ON THE OPPRESSORS AND GIVING THEM SOME OF THEIR OWN MEDICINE.  SUFFICE TO STATE THAT THE EXACT NATURE OF THIS NEW ENTITY AND IT'S PARAMETERS WILL BE OUTLINED.  THIS IS ABSOLUTELY NECESSARY AS WHAT IS BEING CALLED FOR WILL NOT BE ANOTHER  WESTERN NATO PROXY LIKE AL QAEDA OR DAESH NOR A SECTARIAN ENTITY SUCH AS HIZBULLAH .  FORTHCOMING   GLOBAL VISION 2000 EDITORIALS WILL ADDRESS THIS SOON AS IT'S EMERGENCE  IS INEVITABLE JUST AS WE SEE THE SUNSET AND SUNRISE. WE HERALD AND SALUTE THE FORTHCOMING ISLAMIC JUSTICE ARMY WHICH IS LONG OVERDUE                  

UN DOCUMENTS SHOCKING CRIMES BY MYANMAR ARMY 
Top Myanmar generals led brutal campaign against Rohingya involving "gravest crimes under international law"
https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/08/r...44502.html

Myanmar's military carried out mass killings and gang rapes of Rohingya with "genocidal intent" and the commander-in-chief and five generals should be prosecuted, UN investigators said on Monday. It was the first time the United Nations explicitly called for Myanmar officials to face genocide charges over their campaign against the Rohingya, and is likely to deepen the Southeast Asian nation's isolation.  The UN mission found Myanmar's armed forces had taken actions that "undoubtedly amount to the gravest crimes under international law", forcing more than 700,000 Rohingya to flee starting in late August 2017.


Speaking in Geneva on Monday, Marzuki Darusman, the mission's chairman, said his researchers amassed evidence based on 875 interviews with witnesses and victims, satellite imagery, and verified photos and videos. Marzuki said victim accounts were "amongst the most shocking human rights violations" he had come across and would "leave a mark on all of us for the rest of our lives".

WATCH:


He described Myanmar's military as having shown "flagrant disregard for lives" and displayed "extreme levels of brutality".  "The Rohingya are in a continuing situation of severe systemic and institutionalised oppression from birth to death," Marzuki said. The UN does not apply the word "genocide" lightly.  Its assessment suggests crimes against the Rohingya could meet the strict legal definition used in places such as Bosnia, Rwanda and Sudan's Darfur region.


'Burning entire villages'

The team cited a "conservative" estimate from aid group Reporters Without Borders that some 10,000 people had been killed in the violence, but outside investigators have had no access to the affected regions, making a precise accounting elusive, if not impossible.  The UN report said military generals, including Commander-in-Chief Min Aung Hlaing, must face investigation and prosecution for "genocidal intent" in Myanmar's northern Rakhine state, as well as crimes against humanity and other war crimes in the states of Kachin and Shan. The report singled out Myanmar's military, known as the Tatmadaw, but added that other Myanmar security agencies were also involved in abuses. "Military necessity would never justify killing indiscriminately, gang-raping women, assaulting children, and burning entire villages," the report said.  "The Tatmadaw's tactics are consistently and grossly disproportionate to actual security threats, especially in Rakhine state but also in northern Myanmar."

In Rakhine state, there was evidence of extermination and deportation, the report added.
"The crimes in Rakhine state, and the manner in which they were perpetrated, are similar in nature, gravity and scope to those that have allowed genocidal intent to be established in other contexts," the UN mission concluded, adding there was "sufficient information" to prosecute the military's chain of command. 


Christopher Sidoti, a member of the investigatory committee, urged the UN Security Council and General Assembly to act on the report's findings. "We are convinced the international community holds the key to dismantling the destructive veil of impunity in Myanmar," he said.


'This is extremely significant'

Mohammed Jamjoom, Al Jazeera's correspondent in Cox's Bazar   "What we've heard in the report really 
lines up with witness testimonies I've heard here. For most of the past year, when official bodies of governance spoke about the atrocities committed in Rakhine state, they called it ethnic cleansing.  Now there's a very extensive UN fact-finding mission recommending that top tier military officials in Myanmar be prosecuted and investigated for genocide.  When the members of the panel in Geneva laid out their investigation, they said that they conducted 875 interviews, they talked about the destructive veil of impunity in Myanmar and they said that until that is lifted, the cycle of violence in Myanmar will continue.   They said there needs to be a mechanism by which these crimes can be prosecuted and the cycle of violence in Myanmar can be ended.

That's going to be very difficult, we don't know exactly where this goes. At some point, it will be presented to the UN Human Rights Council and then potentially to the UN Security Council.
But we must remember that Myanmar is not a signatory to the Rome Statute, so the International Criminal Court does not have jurisdiction."


Criticism of Aung San Suu Kyi
Investigators compiled a list of suspects, which included Min Aung Hlaing and other military commanders. The mission said a full list of suspects will be made available to any credible body pursuing accountability, adding that the case should be referred to the International Criminal Court, or an ad hoc criminal tribunal.  Myanmar's civilian leadership also drew criticism for its failure to prevent the abuses.  "The State Counsellor, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, has not used her de facto position as Head of Government, nor her moral authority, to stem or prevent the unfolding events in Rakhine State," the report said. 


The Government and the Tatmadaw have fostered a climate in which hate speech thrives, human rights violations are legitimized, and incitement to discrimination and violence facilitated.


UN REPORT
The Nobel Peace Prize laureate has been criticised internationally for her failure to speak out against abuses in Rakhine State and has had several human rights awards rescinded for her stance.

The Rohingya: Silent Abuse
In August 2017, Myanmar's armed forces launched a campaign ostensibly against Rohingya armed groups in Rakhine state.  Investigators documented mass killings, the destruction of Rohingya dwellings, and "large-scale" gang rape by Myanmar soldiers.  The UN's report drew praise from the ground in Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh, where refugee camps have taken in hundreds of thousands of Rohingya from across the border.  "We are happy for this. If these army people are punished the world will take note of it. They are killers. They must be punished," said Mohammed Hasan, 46, who lives in the Kutupalong refugee camp.  "They killed thousands, we have seen that. They torched our homes, that's a fact. They raped our women, that's not false." 



SUU KYI USES FIRST APPEARANCE SINCE UN DAMNING REPORT TO DISCUSS LITERATURE
https://www.presstv.com/Detail/2018/08/2...-UN-report 

Myanmar’s embattled leader Aung San Suu Kyi has resorted to literature instead of addressing the critical humanitarian issues regarding her country’s persecuted Rohingya Muslim minority in her first public appearance a day after a damning report by the United Nations confirmed that “genocide” had occurred in the country under her watch.  In her speech at the University of Yangon on Tuesday, Suu Kyi discussed poetry and literature instead of reviewing the scathing report compiled by a UN mission and published a day earlier, which concluded that Myanmar’s military had carried out a series of “shocking” rights violations against the Rohingya, including mass killings and gang rapes. 

According to the damning report, the military had carried out "genocide" of the Rohingya in Rakhine state, the home province of majority of the Muslims, and was responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity in the states of Rakhine, Shan and Kachin. Myanmar generals directed murder, rape, and arson that sent 700,000 Rohingya Muslims fleeing for their lives, but Aung San Suu Kyi reassures us that the generals she knows are "all rather sweet." Not to worry. 

http://bit.ly/2BtBdAz 
2:52 PM - Aug 21, 2018



In its final report released on Monday, the UN Independent International Fact-Finding Mission on Myanmar said the country’s army, led by Commander-in-Chief Senior-General Min Aung Hlaing, had carried out the “gravest crimes” against the Rohingya with “genocidal intent.”  The UN investigators called for an international probe and prosecution of Myanmar’s army chief and five other top military commanders for their crimes.  However, the Myanmar leader, a former Nobel Peace Prize winner, chose instead to stay silent on all issues of politics and made no mention of the shocking report by the world body.

PressTV-Facebook removes Myanmar's military chief
Facebook removes accounts belonging to Myanmar's military chief and a number of other pages related to Myanmar after a UN fact-finding team calls for his prosecution,

Suu Kyi, whose government is now facing mounting calls to be investigated by the International Criminal Court (ICC) for war crimes, spent almost all the afternoon chatting with students about the merits of Gone With the Wind, a novel by American writer Margaret Mitchell, and the differences between fiction and non-fiction.


Kitty Holland
@KittyHollandIT


Aung San Suu Kyi should be arrested and brought before International War Crimes Tribunal...women and children burnt to death under her watch


10:08 PM - Aug 27, 2018



Last year, Myanmar’s armed forces, backed by Buddhist extremists, launched a state-sponsored crackdown against the Rohingya in Rakhine under the pretext of a number of attacks on military posts blamed on the minority group.


The crackdown, once described by the UN as the textbook example of "ethnic cleansing," forced some 700,000 Rohingya to flee to neighboring Bangladesh, where they are living in overcrowded refugee camps in dire humanitarian conditions.

PressTV-Rohingya rally to mark Myanmar 'genocide' anniversary
Rohingya Muslim refugees in Bangladesh rally to call for "justice" on the anniversary of Myanmar’s deadly crackdown on the minority group.

The new report further lashed out at Myanmar’s de facto leader for failing to give a proper response to the military’s brutalities, which have drawn widespread criticism from the UN and leading international organizations, including Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch.

Myanmar and Bangladesh agreed in January to complete the voluntary repatriation of Rohingya refugees by 2020, followed up by an agreement with the UN last month.  Experts and Rohingya Muslim refugees in Bangladesh say a recent deal falls short of guaranteeing the Muslims’ safe return to Myanmar.


Reply
#7
MYANMAR JUNTA CAN'T STAND THE TRUTH AND EXPOSES IT'S TYRANNY WHICH CAN ONLY BE DEALT WITH AN IRON FIST AND NOT BY TURNING A BLIND EYE 

WORLD REACTS TO SENTENCING OF REUTERS JOURNALISTS IN MYANMAR 
Nations and rights groups decry 'outrageous injustice' as Myanmar sentences Reuters journalists over Rohingya reporting.

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2018/09/w...05150.html

Myanmar court has found two Reuters journalists guilty of breaching a law on state secrets during their reporting of a massacre of Rohingya and sentenced them to seven years in prison, sparking an international outcry. 

The US and British ambassadors who were present at the sentencing of Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo on Monday called the verdict a blow for Myanmar's transition to democracy. Scot Marciel, US ambassador to Myanmar, said he was "sad for Wa lone and Kyaw Soe Oo and their families, but also for Myanmar".  "It's deeply troubling ... one has to ask will this process increase or decrease the confidence the people of Myanmar have in their justice system," he said.

Al Jazeera condemns sentencing of Reuters reporters in Myanmar Dan Chugg, British ambassador to Myanmar expressed extreme disappointment and lambasted presiding Judge Ye Lwin over the verdict.  "The judge has appeared to have ignored evidence and to have ignored Myanmar law. This has dealt a hammer blow for the rule of law," he said.   Iqbal Sobhan Chowdhury, media adviser to Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina, also strongly condemned the verdict. 

"It is now an open secret that any media or any person who wants to reveal the atrocities of the Myanmar army and administration against the Rohingya people will face persecution by the Myanmar government," he said.  Bangladesh hosts more than 700,000 Rohingya who fled Myanmar following a security crackdown by its army in Rakhine State last year.

'Unfair and one-sided'

WATCH:
 Myanmar charges Reuters reporters under Official Secrets Act (2:17)


Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo had pleaded not guilty to violating the colonial-era Official Secrets Act, punishable by up to 14 years in prison. They contended they were framed by police.   The Reuters reporters were arrested on December 12 while investigating the killing of 10 Rohingya and other abuses involving soldiers and police in Inn Din, a village in Rakhine State.  Myanmar has denied allegations of atrocities made by thousands of refugees against its security forces, saying it conducted a legitimate military operation against Rohingya fighters.  But the military has acknowledged the killing of the 10 Rohingya men and boys at Inn Din after arresting the Reuters reporters.  Wa Lone, calling Monday's decision "unfair" and "one-sided", said it "directly threatens" Myanmar's democracy and freedom of the press.   
Speaking to reporters on the court steps after the sentencing, Wa Lone gave a defiant "thumbs up" and said: "We will face it [the verdict] with stability and courage". 
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Myanmar rejects UN findings in Rohingya genocide report
Kyaw Soe Oo also said the reporters had committed no crime and that they would maintain their fight for press freedom.  "What I want to say to the government is: you can put us in jail, but do not close the eyes and ears of the people," he said.    The case has drawn worldwide attention as an example of how press freedom is suffering under the government of Myanmar's de facto leader and Nobel Peace laureate Aung San Suu Kyi
Kristian Schmidt, EU ambassador to Myanmar, in a post on T
witter, said the prison sentences of Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo should be "reviewed and they should be released immediately and unconditionally". 

EU: The prison sentences of Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo should be reviewed and they should be released immediately and unconditionally.  

Expressing his disappointment, Knut Ostby, UN resident and humanitarian aid coordinator in Myanmar, also called for the release of the journalists.   "The United Nations has consistently called for the release of the Reuters journalists and urged the authorities to respect their right to pursue freedom of expression and information," he said.  "Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo should be allowed to return to their families and continue their work as journalists."  Denmark, in a statement, urged Myanmar's government to undo "this injustice", while a spokesman at the Dutch embassy in Myanmar called on President Win Myint to release the two journalists as soon as possible.

'A new low for Myanmar'


Stephen J Adler, Reuters' editor-in-chief, called the ruling a "major step backward in Myanmar's transition to democracy" and said it "must be corrected by the Myanmar government as a matter of urgency".  He denounced the charges against the reporters as "false" and "designed to silence their reporting and intimidate the press". 

"We will not wait while Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo suffer this injustice and will evaluate how to proceed in the coming days, including whether to seek relief in an international forum," he added.  Phil Robertson, deputy Asia director for the Human Rights Watch, called the sentence an "outrageous injustice" and said Myanmar's military, also known as the Tatmadaw, wanted a guilty verdict against the two reporters in order to "intimidate" other journalists to avoid reporting on human rights violations. 

"This is clearly a situation when the Tatmadaw has won the day," he told Al Jazeera.
"This is a court system that has been very close to the Burmese military, [and] has done its dirty work in the past. We do not really see the kind the of independent judiciary that we would expect in a modern democracy." 

No words for this outrageous injustice against @Reuters reporters Wa Lone & Kyaw Soe Oo. How can #Myanmar judicial system justify sending reporters doing their job to a longer prison sentence than the #Tatmadaw soldiers who killed the 10 #Rohingya in their story in cold blood?

The Committee to Protect Journalists also condemned the sentencing of Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo, saying it marked a "new low for Myanmar".  "The process that resulted in their convictions was a travesty of justice and will cast Myanmar as an anti-democratic pariah as long as they are wrongfully held behind bars," said Shawn Crispin, CPJ's senior Southeast Asia representative in a statement

Amnesty International's Tirana Hassan called the verdict "a politically motivated decision" with significant ramifications for press freedom in Myanmar. "It sends a stark warning to other journalists of the severe consequences that await should they look too closely at military abuses. This amounts to censorship through fear," she said.  Thant Myint-U, Myanmar historian and commentator, said the verdict marked a "tragic day for media freedom and an intimation of what's to come".  In the Kutupalong refugee camp in Bangladesh, Mohib Ullah, a Rohingya leader, said he hoped the two journalists are freed soon.  This is not justice. I would like to see them free as soon as possible. They did nothing wrong," he said. 
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